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My Sense of Snow (January Talking Meme)

January talking meme, Jan 10. From astrogirl2: Once Upon a Time! Maybe talk about Snow White.


So apparently I had a few things to say about Snow.

I have mentioned several times that my favorite character on OUAT is Emma, but that wasn't always the case. Early on, my favorite character was Snow White. And point of clarification: Snow White, not Mary Margaret. I have since then found Emma's journey more interesting, but Snow was the spicy action hero straight of out the gate, while Emma sort of stumbled around Storybrooke with a befuddled expression on her face.

On Snow in general: OUAT Snow is to my mind the anti-Snow White if you go, like me, purely off the Disney version of the character: snarky, brave, smart, and certainly not one to wait around for Prince Charming to save her. Rather the opposite, really. But at the same time, she's open to love and romance with same, and equally open to female friendships. I liked her friendship with Red, but especially appreciated her friendship (yes, even as cursed Mary Margaret) and adult mother/child relationship with Emma.

Snow has a strong moral sense that motivates her actions, although after a while, she seemed so Good and True and blindly determined to "do the right thing" all the time, I found myself more drawn to Emma, who is the unequivocally messed up emotional denial queen. Eventually, of course, Snow was pushed to her limit, and dark side of her determination started to show. Naturally, this happened in relationship to Regina, who I'll get to in a moment.

Besides gung-ho Dudley DoRightedness, Snow's other real flaw is fussing. She's a woman of action, but when something blocks the path of immediate action, she fusses. She wants to act and she can't, which drives her nuts. If the OUAT character's cursed persona is anything like the real them, this explains Mary Margaret's dithering over her affair with David. Dithering is not a thing she does, except when something stands in the way of action, as the moral consequences of having an affair with a married man would do for someone used to acting almost recklessly in service to their moral compass.


Snow and Emma: Snow and Emma start out as Mary Margaret and Emma, two women roughly the same age who meet and become friends, then roommates, and then good friends. Actually, they start out as a mother and her infant, but that comes and goes so quickly it's not much of a relationship.

Uuuuuuurk. Put the brakes on. Of course it is. A mother has nine months with her child, regardless of whether she keeps them or gives them up. And that's one of the most intimate relationships you can have with another person, even if they aren't big on personality when they're in the womb. Nine months is a lot of time to build hopes and dreams, expectations, and even begin to think you know a few things about your child. I think a lot of mothers who know ahead of time they are going to give up their child try to avoid forming a relationship with their baby bump. Snow White would not have been one of these mothers, because she doesn't even find out she must give Emma up until what, the third trimester? And she still wants to find a way not to?

Suffice it to say that parting was wrenching, and Snow has a big Emma-sized hole in her heart that grownup Emma can never fill. That a baby sibling for Emma can never fill. This makes their relationship as two adults especially complicated, and not in an overt way.

And I do like watching that relationship evolve. As much as I didn't care for the split narrative in the first half of season 2 that put Snow and Emma in one story line and everyone else in another, their FTL foray gave Emma a chance to get to know her mother for who she really is, and to see just how much nature contributed to who Emma is. I think Emma is a bit obsessed with what nurture has made her, and overlooked, as "abandoned" children will do, the nature part of the equation.

These two still have some work to do relating to each other as parent and child rather than equals, though, and it's an uphill climb.


Snow and Regina: Snow's life has been defined for years by her feud with her stepmother Regina, or rather, Regina's feud with her. Snow knows the part she played in ruining Regina's life: in all innocence, Snow as a child told Regina's mother about Regina's secret lover, even after Regina asked her not to. Snow, who had a good relationship with a kind and loving mother, couldn't fathom Cora's reaction to this news being any less loving and benevolent than her own mother's would have been.

But Cora kills the Daniel the stable boy. Which means it's Cora that Regina should be angry with: her expectations on Regina and how ruthlessly and uncompromisingly she pursues them. We all know this. All of us except Regina. In her own inexorably messed up way, Regina can't find it in herself to aim her ire at her mother, so she aims it at Snow, the privileged princess around who Regina's husband, the king's, world turns.

Regina now wants to ruin Snow's life in return, and you can see Snow practically bursting with frustration that she can't fix the situation. Regina's ire and bitterness makes little sense to her like the way it makes little sense to us, and Snow thinks she can fix it with rationality and logic and kindness. But irrational people aren't ours to fix that way. That doesn't stop Snow from trying though, because that's Snow. She's a fixer.

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Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
astrogirl2
Jan. 11th, 2014 04:18 am (UTC)
You do, indeed, have lots of interesting thoughts about Snow! And you're right, she really is a fixer. And a fusser, when her path to action is thwarted. I don't know that I would have thought to put it that way, but it's very tue.
masqthephlsphr
Jan. 11th, 2014 06:01 pm (UTC)
I didn't even realize it until I started writing.
; )
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )